I have no words

The trend of ridiculously insulting college parties continues at Clemson University in South Carolina.

You know, there has to be a point when you’re applying black makeup from head to toe when you realize — damn, this is almost as racist as it gets. But that didn’t stop this idiot from leaving the frat house.
I’m with Tara Henley on this one, I hope the university officials send these privileged fools to do charity work in the hood.I don’t know what has to be done, but this has got to stop.

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Comments

  1. i don’t know what to say, or how to feel. is this something new or has this been going on for years? this ish has gotten out of control,at this point i want a Dateline investigation into this crap.

  2. Damnit. This ish here. What century are we in again? And why is it that this story hasn’t (at least to my knowledge) floated up to the network news? I’ve been seeing it only in the bloggersphere. Bravo to Tara for formulating an intelligent response, as looking at the photo only illicts anger, frustration, and ire from me.

  3. I agree with you, bella. They should do community service in the hood– in blackface. It would be an interesting social experiment to see if they make it out alive.

  4. what happened to that one person who would trick on people doing this, because that’s the person who has names to attach to these photos and the info to shame these people.

  5. accidentalextraordinaire says:

    See, I try to be calm. *sigh* I refuse to give people like him my anger.

  6. Coffy, I know Pimp & Ho parties have been going on for eons, but I’ve never seen footage of people padding their pants or donning blackface like this until recently. This certainly didn’t happen at my college, but I went to a pretty diverse school. So many emotions when I see this photo – anger, disgust, depression… I can’t even wrap my mind around it all.

  7. Monica's back says:

    Unfortunately, I’m not too suprised. Media is powerful. These white kids see these negative images of us and emulate what they see. Yes, they should have known better but they don’t. NOTE: Black folks if we want people to respect us, they’ve got to see us respecting ourselves. Black ‘popular’ culture does not do that. Where do you think these white kids are getting this stuff from? Grills, padded big butts, gang signs thrown in the air, women dressed as hoochies, gang clothing. (Sounds like a typical rap video or hood movie). I love freedom of speech and expression but it comes with a sense of responsibility. Dave Chapelle recently spoke on the social impact his comedy was having: “It was trippin’ me out to have white kids come up to me and repeat my stuff ….. and they did it in front of my kids. – I didn’t like how I saw some of these white kids were using my comedy.” If you don’t believe this go on youtube. Enough said.

  8. While I think this type of thing is horrible, I am growing calloused from it & no longer get angry at these displays of ignorance. White people just don’t get it & obviously are not ashamed to act like an ass for the world to see.

    I like the idea of doing community service in Black Face in the hood. Then they can see how we really do it ghetto style.

  9. Oh how I wish this dye just sticks to that guy for a while… Not that he’ll learn anything from it… unlesse he comes strolling in Montreal-North one of these days…
    Ack!

  10. jerseybred says:

    I’m at a lost for words…This is how some people feel about the Black population. All people have to do better in promoting racial tolerance, not sterotypes.

  11. Unfortunately this has been going on for years, a well kept secret you could say. Now that technology has advanced and websites like facebook can allow many people to see your business, lets just say that these pampered greeks slipped up. Their parents have done it and they are doing it to. When to much heat is put on the topic it’ll stop until they can think of something else to do commemorate their unanimous feelings toward people of color without people finding out. Racism is still alive and going strong.

  12. StPat Jack says:

    The only clear solution, if there is such a thing, to minimizing these types of occurances is the involvement of nonracist white people. The other people in attendance at the party are just as guilty as the fool that came painted black. Just as some posters here and at other sites have pointed out that black people should make an effort to change their popoular image, white people need to check other white people.
    My white husband has jumped to the defense of minorities, whether or not minorities were present, when comments or racist actions took place. He was raised in a nonracist home. How many people, whatever the race, can say they ALWAYS speak out when racist comments are made?
    Until everyone complains about these examples of hate, things will NEVER get better.

  13. What da h-? This is who America dubs as the future of our country. We are in a whole lotta trouble!

  14. BlackHoney says:

    I don’t think black people should have to change our popular image. 1) Some people are always going to be racist. They will find the most assimilated black person and find some reason to impersonate them. 2) When we criticize ourselves harshly and laugh and taut or look down oncertain aspects of African American life, we give others permission to do so as well. White people didn’t invent the word ghetto-fabulous, we did. We don’t always appreciate nappy hair, so others laugh at it. We criticize men who wear jerseys and grillz and caps, therefore other do also.

  15. Kudos to Monica!!!!

    Community Service? Why on earth would we want these people to come into our neighborhoods and community? To teach them the way that they should go????/ I mean, we tend to waste sooooo much time trying to convert racist white people to respect us, yet we don’t take NEARLY as much energy and time to focus on why we are not respecting ourselves to stop GIVING them these stereotypes(that are quitereal, unfortunately) to copycat…

    “This is who America dubs as the future of our country. We are in a whole lotta trouble!-anjol”

    These people are not the future of our country…they are the present state of our country…aka..the government, and too many more to list…and yes, we are in a state of a whole lot of trouble…this sort of action is nothing new…we are acting as if white people have never acted out in such atrocity. The change does NOT start with “reforming” white people or getting “non-racist” white people to respect us(what the He**), we have been asking for their respect for years now, and it has not gotten us anywhere, can we start asking ourselves to respect each other first?…it starts within our own communities…we need to come together again as a whole…thats the true answer…stop waiting for the great white hope boat..it’s not coming!!!!

    A great book on racism is: The United Independent Compensatory Code / System / Concept: A textbook / workbook for thought, speech and/or action for victims of racism (white supremacy) by Neely Fuller

    and

    The Isis Papers by Francess Cress Welsing

  16. well the story finally made it to the mainstream media: http://www.cnn.com/2007/EDUCATION/01/31/gangsta.parties.ap/index.html

  17. I was just invited to a “white-trash” party that was being hosted by a bunch of predominantly white students and I gladly declined the offer. I immediately thought of this post and thought about how wrong it is to mock any group of persons from any culture. I read the CNN article and I have to agree that some African Americans in the media (musicians, comedians, entertainers) do in fact perpetuate these images and stereotypes. By openly ridiculing certain, less admirable persons of the culture, the dirty laundry has been aired. In a country whose history is steeped in racism, African Americans must be careful about how they speak about themselves, even if in jest. I am from the Caribbean, so I cannot speak in the first person, but I can say that I sympathize with the African Americans that do not emulate or lead the stereotypical lives portrayed in the media. And, I try to help others to understand that these stereotypes do not reign throughout African American homes. I think that all black people (myself included)need to continue to defy these portrayals of ourselves as babbling buffoons (yes, West Indians too), because not only are our silence and tolerance permitting outsiders to perceive us in a negative way, but our complacency is also permitting our children to process and internalize these images. Black children are internalizing these images of black men who only care about cars, money and female genitalia and of black women who need only to shake their half-naked butts to get attention. Our children are defining themselves based on these images. For a second, put aside what’s been said about and done to us, and talk to a sister or brother about how we can break the cycle within the family circle. Know what I mean? Thanks for posting this Afrobella..it’s created quite a dialogue…and who doesn’t love dialogue? Peace and hair grease.

  18. i agree Teri, there needs to be a balance in the images that we put out into society.

  19. Ancient Astronaut says:

    Aww come on people, this is just their way of wanting to come back home. They do this: KKK dressing up like the Perfect Black, Osiris, The Vatican kissing the Black feet of the Black Madonna, botox, lips, buttocks injections and heated curls, Justin and Britannyisms, excessive tribal and other kinds of tattoos (synthetic melanin??)and rap music…all because they desire to come back home. Their just our lost children and we really have to show them how to act. But we can’t do that until we show ourselves how to act. This is a negative representation, popular…but negative. They are just showing us how we act on TV and in the malls, schools and clubs. Don’t get mad, it’s true. Somewhere there are negroes who look like that. So why get mad?? Why continuously be shocked?? Come, come now. The media loves it when we get like this. It gives them an excuse to call themselves the “N” word, so then 50 years down the line that term will be static and grey, and will not evoke any unease within the Black mind. So all you can really do is prepare your offspring for a rough ride baby, cause it ain’t goin’ nowhere (exuse the double negative there), unless of course there’s some revolution…of the mind, more than of the matter, which leads to that saying, “MIND OVER MATTER..IF YOU DON”T MIND, THEN IT DON’T MATTER”. Now go and finish celebrating Black History weeks before you get too angry.

  20. Oh, stop being all updity and crap.

  21. I am an african-american black sistah, and i am only 15 years old. I grew up in a very isolated town where racism was almost distinct… It was a small town in New Jersey, color didn’t matter, neither did race. I never thought anything of color, because in my young mind i thought, ‘It doesn’t matter, it will never be looked at by another person in a negative way.’ I found that to be true, untill my family and i moved out to Georgia for a cheeper housing market (at age 11). This is when i began to experience racist comments, that at first shocked me and still does to this very day. Yes, i know that racism has not died, and that as long as people raise their children to think racist-like than it will continue. I just wonder so often if it will ever change, we never know… I mean Obama, a black and white man was elected as president by Popular Sovereignty, which J. F. Kennedy, less than 60 years ago, said that he “doubted(a negroe man) would ever become president in another 50 years or so”. So it may happen.I am against white and black supremacy, because no single race should be allowed power over another. God made us all equal. On top of that, i do believe that blacks do degrade other blacks, this is based upon the experiances i have gone through throughout my short 15 years of life. Most recently, i have been told by ones closest to me about how they dont like darker-toned blacks. This hurts me and makes me think “where do i lye?”. Because i am a beautiful, darkskinned girl(a medium-dark tone)… and i question if i am looked on as worse or uglier than my fellow light-skinned friends, only because of my complextion(because i am prettier than most of them.) Yet i still feel looked down upon. Once i was in class and i was speaking with this one darkskinned guy who was about my complexion, a little darker, who to me was FINE/ and i’m picky. I was conversing with him and my former lightskinned friend and we were talking about his family, She then said… “UR NOT AS PRETTY AS YOUR MOTHER AND FATHER, BECAUSE YOUR NOT AS LIGHT” speaking to him. This comment left me in Aw, because his parents were not pretty (at all/ i dont know where he got his genes??) but he was gorgeous. With all that being said, i just find it sad that i am only 15 and i have experienced 11(and still counting) negative racial comments. And that at age 12 i had already experienced 9. I wonder HOW and IF this problem can be fixed, if it can, which i am praying for.

  22. Letsbefair says:

    Come on everyone, let’s be fair. You guys are ridiculous. Has anyone on this website EVER watched the Chappelle Show? Where Dave Chappelle dresses up as a “white” guy…white powder and all. And that was on national television. Now you guys want to get upset about a pimps and hoes party? All of you need to grow up and quit looking to have people feel sorry for African American’s. I’m tired of having to tip-toe around minorities. They speak their mind about whites, so why can’t we do the same?

    HOLLA BACK

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