Afrobella of the Week — Michelle Obama

While I certainly have my own political leanings, my goal with this post isn’t to sway anyone. Although I do work for the “liberal media,” I actually have friends of all affiliations. So I know how bloody obnoxious it can be when someone tries to shove their beliefs down your throat, and I never want to be that person.

However, regardless of your political affiliation, I think everyone can agree that we’re living in interesting political times. The two most-talked-about democratic candidates are a white woman and a black man. No matter how you slice it, the upcoming American presidential election will be historic.

The democratic party nomination race is in a dead heat and I’ve been soaking up all the coverage like a sponge. Now’s a great time to educate yourself about the candidates by watching the debates. I’m a sucker for a great orator and I’m wary of political dynasties, so Barack Obama piqued my interest early on. I think the senator is a charming and fascinating enough gentleman on his own. But there’s something undeniably special about his wife, Michelle. The more I see and learn about her, the more I love this lady! She’s totally a friend-in-my-head and there are three compelling reasons why I had to name this bella Afrobella of the Week – regardless of the way she wears her hair.

1. Because she keeps it real. I completely buy Michelle and Barack’s relationship. I don’t detect a whiff of “this will look good on camera,” or “this’ll play in the red states” about it. Michelle has been criticized for deflating her husband’s ego with witty-yet-loving put-downs about his housework shortcomings and fashion flubs. But I personally love her depreciating humor towards her husband’s new-found fame — with the ego-stroking that’s coming from all corners, I think having someone remind him that he is just a man is a good thing. I also think she dealt gracefully with the Obama girl phenomenon — I might not have responded as eloquently to that kind of come-on.

Many have criticized her decision to leave her six-figure-salary dream job in order to support her husband’s campaign — witness this searing Salon.com putdown of Mrs. Obama as yet another top-tier, well educated woman who abandons the world of work to stand by her man and raise her children. As someone who’s been married for five years, I know the crossroads Barack and Michelle Obama likely found themselves at — that age-old “marriage is compromise” crossroad where the ambitious prospects of one supersedes that of the other. It’s not a fun juncture, and I am sure that their decision came after many sleepless nights and a lot of deep thought and serious conversations. It isn’t my place to judge their relationship or their career decisions, just as it’s nobody’s place to judge mine. I can’t pretend to have walked a mile in their shoes. As this great compilation of reactions on Racialicious reveals, everyone’s looking to Michelle Obama to make a misstep, and her every move will be analysed under the microscope of race, gender, and feminism. But despite that pressure, Michelle is doing a great job of maintaining grace under pressure, and unlike some of the other nominees’ wives, there’s no question so far that she could make a phenomenal first lady.

2. She’s thinking about the kids. Barack and Michelle’s two daughters, Sasha and Malia, are beautiful little angels. Check them out on the official Obama Christmas card. Michelle based her decision for leaving her job on her children, and in this interview with the Chicago Tribune, she admits that at times she feels like a single mother. I think having someone who has dealt with those particular life-balancing struggles, whose little girls are at an impressionable age, and who knows the reality African American families are going through from having seen it up close and personal, be the first lady and the would-be president’s closest adviser, could lead to the kind of change that this country needs. I hope that the next president will give the education system the attention it demands, instead of just another pithy slogan. I hope that the family focus on health care translates into a real, achievable plan that can help the people who need it the most. Michelle is described as Barack’s rock, and as a strong, smart, experienced woman with opinions and values of her own, I hope she can bring her expertese to the table, in order to help to effect positive change if the Obamas are elected into the White House.

3. She’s an effortlessly elegant, low-maintainance beauty. In fact, in a recent Chicago Sun-Times nterview I learned about via 55 Secret Street, Michelle explains why she avoids the pre-appearance makeup routine. “I love girly makeup and stuff, but my view is that’s a lot of work,” she said, explaining her decision to routinely skip the makeup chair. “I want people to get used to my face more naturally so that I don’t have to do that every day. Who’s got time to put eyelashes on and all that?” Most women don’t. I don’t even have kids, and I’ve pared down my daily beauty regime to a tight ten-minute application. Michelle Obama’s figured out what works for her — classic clothing styles, beautiful and clear skin, tasteful accessories — and she wears it all with confidence. As this Chicago-Tribune article reveals, that’s because of the essence of her character.

The poise that you see is genuine,” says her older brother Craig Robinson. “She is quite comfortable in all situations.” David Mosena, who hired her to be his deputy chief of staff when he worked for Mayor Richard Daley in the early ’90s, says, “She has her feet solidly on the ground, both of them. There’s not a bone of superficiality in her. She is the real deal. … She is very comfortable with herself.” That comes across to me, and in turn inspires my confidence in her and her husband.

Michelle Obama struggles, like many of us do, to juggle all of the balls that life has handed her. And I think she’s doing a great job so far. Maybe you don’t know much about Michelle. Maybe haven’t heard her speak yet, or you’ve only read the criticism about her. If you’re interested in learning more, check out this brief getting-to-know-you clip from Countdown With Keith Olbermann, in which former Afrobella of the Week Alison Stewart introduces Michelle Obama.

I’m in agreement with Essence magazine, I think Michelle Obama is one of the most inspiring women around right now. I’m proud to name her Afrobella of the Week, and I wish nothing but good things for her, her family, and her husband’s campaign. Congratulations, Michelle! Keep on being yourself. You make this Afrobella very proud.

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Comments

  1. Michelle is definitely Barack’s rock and a great choice for Afrobella of the Week.

    Keep up the great articles. I love it.

  2. I stumbled upon your blog via the Black Weblog Awards. Read a couple of your posts, and I immediately became hooked. GREAT blog.

    By the way, politics aside … As a native of the cornfields of Illinois, I’ve followed the Obamas’ careers for quite a while now. I’m definitely a fan!

  3. She’s totally a friend-in-my-head and there are three compelling reasons why I had to name this bella Afrobella of the Week – regardless of the way she wears her hair.

    She is definitely a great choice – regardless of the way she wears her hair.

    And I totally get the “friend-in-my-head” part. :)

  4. Michelle Obama makes me proud to call mahself a black woman. Her life can be used as inspiration because she seemingly has it all: A wonderfully intelligent, visionary and ambitious black man, two beautiful black daughters, she’s educated, independent, career-oriented and the consumate professional. I like Michelle Obama and Hilary Clinton. Defining the new womanhood. Powerful, intelligent, smart, savy, authentic. Loves it!

    Why should she be criticized for leaving her career? If her husband does’nt win the democratic nomination…trust…her and Obama will be ok. Their power and money can only exponetially increase. Just like the Clintons, they are a powerful couple and they can’t be denied.

    At this point…the president’s wife simply does not work…she either becomes a philanthropist, creates a foundation, or creates a powerful combination of being a mother and tightening those first lady skills…neither are easy…and Michelle seems to pull off her duties with ease and class.

    You know what I love most…(and this may come off as superficial)…she’s brown. She’s not some typical light-skinned barbie doll trophy wife. It says so much more about Obama’s choice in women. Michelle clearly has substance. And you can’t beat that with a bat.

  5. This lady appears to be really down to earth, I think that’s phenomenal..

  6. Bella,
    what a wonderful choice for Afrobella of the week! Have a super day………smile.

  7. Sunseeker says:

    Hi Bella,

    Michelle Obama is a great choice for Afrobella of the week. Despite being as accomplished as she is she seems very grounded and genuine.

  8. love michelle.she is definitely afrobella of the week

  9. Flash back 1984 Democratic Presidential Campaign…
    the white woman- Geraldine Ferraro
    the black man- Rev. Jesse Jackson
    It’s happened before, I imagine this’ll go the way that went, and I don’t remember the populous gushing over Jacqueline Jackson, a similarly common black women, either. It’s to early in the game, this Obama/Clinton business is just political entertainment for the masses. The dark horse, the future prez of the US, has yet to be revealed.

  10. I really, really want to like Michelle but some of the things she says makes me cringe. She really does put down her husband a lot in public. She also comes across as too truthful. Republicans and her detractors love to take her truth and twist it. Sometimes, I wish she play it more safe. Unfortunately, taking lots of risk is death in politics. She can run her mouth, after Obama is in the White House.

  11. great post, bella. michelle obama does seem to be quite grounded in who she is, and i find this inspiring too!

  12. Michelle Obama is truly an inspiration, I like her down-to-earth style and how she keeps Barack’s ego in check (gotta love that) and the fact that she does it in such a sweet comical way is really nice. I hope the best for them and their little girls. Great Afrobella of the Week!

  13. I love her, and isn’t good to have another intellectual sister in the news besides Condalezza(sp).

  14. “You know what I love most…(and this may come off as superficial)…she’s brown. She’s not some typical light-skinned barbie doll trophy wife.”

    I agree Melinda.
    but I hope this does not become a war on the color spectrum.

  15. grownnsxc says:

    Part of the reason that I would vote for Barack is because of Michelle. It’s good to see a black couple of equal proportions making it work. Michelle is just as educated, smart, savvy, and witty as Barack is and you can tell that there is a mutual respect between them. Go Team Obama!
    OH! And I fell in love with Michelle after Barack won the IL Senate seat and he and his family were on stage celebrating. One of the little girls started getting out of hand and Michelle pulled her back “black momma style”. You could see her mouthing, “Get yourself over here!” under her breath while still maintaing her composure. Absolutely loved every min. of it.

  16. @glamour puss
    I don’t see why it would. Beautiful is beautiful, and it’s lovely to see someone outside the typical range of what we’re presented with skin-tone wise.

  17. She reminds the world what many black women (and men) have known for years, that we are present, professional, articulate, elegant and intelligent (all of that while handling our business). We don’t see many positive images of ourselves outside of the entertainment industry in the media and I think she is great choice for Afrobella of the Week!

  18. Great choice!!

  19. Hey Afrobella! I love the blog and have linked you to my own :D.

    Michelle Obama is a great choice, I respect her so much.

  20. curious onlooker says:

    Eleanor Holmes Norton, Carol Moseley Braun, Maxine Waters, Sheila Jackson Lee, Marion Wright Edelman, Donna Brazille, all the black women federal judges, congressional and presidential cabinet staffers, and the list goes on and on and on…there are hundreds of really hard working black women who represent beauty, elegance, intelligence in the media and outside the media who are NOT in the entertainment industry. These comments commending Michelle Obama for being the ONLY intelligent, elegant black woman out there are just mean-spirited, and in true afrobella fashion… insulting.

  21. I love Michelle (along with the rest of the blogosphere I believe). I did skim through the linked Salon article and was happy to see that so many readers disagreed with the mindless article written by the supposed “feminist”. I hope to learn more about her throughout the race.

  22. tallphlihoney says:

    Great post. I think very highly of the Obamas. Michelle is a showing the world what we in the Black community already know, sistas hold it down, keep it up, represent, are a true backbone, and are a force to be reckoned with – just like tens of thousands of other Black women in this country (whether they have an uber-successful husband or not). Kudos, Bella.

  23. tallphlihoney says:

    @Melinda – Hating on someone because of their skin color (dark vs light or whatever…) is still hate. As Black people we have to let go of this skin color thing. None of us has a lick of control over what our skin tone is. As a light-skinned Black woman, I am tired of being vilified by my own people for something I have no control over. Further, over the reaction OTHER PEOPLE (read: men, supposedly) have to my skin tone. It’s 2007 mami, let’s let this go.

  24. Hey, the new logo looks GREAT!!!

  25. I’m so glad you featured Ms. Michelle Obama in the Afrobella of the Week post. I definitely agree with your three point. She is very charismatic and I admire her intelligence and her demand for Senator to be involved in their children’s lives. Great post!!!

  26. The Beautiful One says:

    To Curious Onlooker:
    Thank you for mentioning just a few of thos very important, elegant, intelligent Black women that have more than paved the way for the Michelle Obama’s of the world, for you and I , and the other women who care to comment in this fourm. You raised a very good point!
    However, I’m confused as to who said the “only” comment that you remarked upon in your posted comment.
    Let’s not forget this, and unfortunately it’s true, a lot of us can’t see past our nose or the television when we need a role model to look up to. I commend Mrs. Obama but she is another great woman of many in our history and in the history of the world, my mother being another one of them.

  27. The Beautiful One says:

    those

  28. The Beautiful One says:

    forum, rather. My goodness! Sorry.

  29. tallphlihoney Says: August 20th, 2007 at 10:23 pm
    @Melinda – Hating on someone because of their skin color (dark vs light or whatever…) is still hate. As Black people we have to let go of this skin color thing. None of us has a lick of control over what our skin tone is. As a light-skinned Black woman, I am tired of being vilified by my own people for something I have no control over. Further, over the reaction OTHER PEOPLE (read: men, supposedly) have to my skin tone. It’s 2007 mami, let’s let this go.

    WOW, THIS IS WHAT I WAS AFRAID OF.

    I refuse to get into a debate about this yet again but I don’t think Melinda was issuing a slur(sp) at you or any other fair complected black woman. She was simply saying that it is nice to see a darker black woman in the media too.

    For example, Tyra Banks and Beyonce look very nice on their magazine covers, and I loved when I saw Alec Wek on this months Vogue cover, since its so rare to see a dark woman like Alec on the cover. That does not take away from light-skin blk women the example above is just acknowleding a wider variety of beauty rarley embraced by mainstream America.

    As someone who is lighter than Michelle Obama, I can understand what many darker complectd black females go through when looking for women that look like them in the media. I for one don’t think many darker females are into vilify light skinned women for the fun of it. Melinda felt more of a connection to Michele because of her complexion for whatver reason. Lets just let this be, okay.

  30. tallphlihoney says:

    glamour puss Says: August 21st, 2007 at 4:35 pm
    WOW, THIS IS WHAT I WAS AFRAID OF. I refuse to get into a debate about this yet again but I don’t think Melinda was issuing a slur(sp) at you or any other fair complected black woman. … I for one don’t think many darker females are into vilify light skinned women for the fun of it. Melinda felt more of a connection to Michele because of her complexion for whatver reason. Lets just let this be, okay.

    GP: You are making A LOT of assumptions about things neither I nor Melinda said. A couple of which are: 1) Assuming I am not sensitive to the issues of how ALL black women are portrayed in the media or elsewhere; and 2) You assume that I am only comfortable with depictions of black women who look like me – with no regard to black women of other skin tones. The thing is my mother is darker than I am and so is my daughter. For you to assume that I don’t care about the images they see in media and how said images impact them or any of my other sistren is ludicrous and ill-conceived. I will not “let it be,” if for no other reason than to continue to try and shed some light on things for my sisters who share you “view.” It’s one things to ask and another to assume. You know the old adage about the latter… PEACE

  31. tallphlihoney says:

    Oops, should have been “your view.”

  32. Great choice. I don’t know why it was controversial for her to join the campaign. Running for President is no joke. It’s about the candidate regardless of gender…everyone has to scarifice. I would do the same in a heart beat for my husband (if I were married and he were running for office.)

    I just found your blog and I am loving it. I cut out the chemicals a few years ago. I’m kind of bored with my short ‘fro and look forward to reading up on what the heck to do with my natural hair.

  33. I’m sort of confused as to who exactly gives light skinned black women grief. Ok in the projects maybe, but in college, in professional life, I don’t think black women (who have the basics and don’t have to worry about eating) give light skinned black women grief.

    The only people I hear going on about that are people who are light (or in their minds think that they are) going on and on about something that happened in the 5th grade.

    Let’s really not play this game though. I mean who do you think gets more grief as an 8 year old girl.

    A dark black girl with short nappy hair or a light black girl with long wavy hair.

    I’m a size 4 and I don’t say things like “Why do big women always give me grief.” You know why, because I know. I know it’s alot easier for me being me than it is for someone else being big and if sometimes people give me a little crap and call me a skinny bitch oh well, I can deal. I also had big long crazy hair (now I have dreads) and I got a bit of grief. I still get a little bit of grief, but that’s because I’m super cute and I know it, but come now, lets keep it real.

    Lets not start with the violins when we know darn well why certain people give us grief or we “think” they are giving us greif.

    Also lets be honest as to who gets impacted more in regards to things.

    When I look at the leaders in the black community none of their wives looked like my Nigerian grandmother, but the did look like Halle Berry.

    In college the black women in the good sorority, again, none of them look like my grandmother.

    In my professional life when I meet a professional black man, none of their wives look like my grandmother.

    Yet and still I never, ever hear very dark skinned sisters complain. Not ever. It sort of makes me mad, they should get more mad, but it’s almost as if we have cut the tongue out of our dark skinned sisters. They aren’t allowed to get mad. Dark skinned black women, the smart ones that study, that didn’t go to prom, or join sororities, they never say a darn thing.

    The rest of us complain all the darn time.

    “They don’t like me cause I’m light, cause I’m skinny, cause I have long hair…” Some us really should get off the whinetrain, because the people running their mouths the most have the least to complain about.

    I’m not hating on lighter skinned black women, but I think darker skinned black women have it 10 times harder in the black community and if anyone gives light black women grief, its probably white women if they think you want to date “their” men.

    I’d like to go there. I mean black women are always on the defense, but what about the black women who end up with jezebel label. I get alot of grief from white women and that never gets discussed, it always gets discussed in reverse.

    That’s the media for you, our place is suppose to be at the bottom of the beauty pile.

    Anyways why don’t we go into that instead of the “I’m light and I’m ok” silliness, we all know you’re ok.

    If you got issues that’s in your own head. I never know what complexion someone is online, but if they are light and value that certain people seem to feel that’s an important fact to bring up even when it has absolutely nothing to do with the conversation, sort of like me being a size 4.

    See how I keep bringing that up, because I value that and its my way to brag…lol…

    This is a general statement, since this topic tends to come up multiple times on many people of African descent boards.

    Jane

  34. TheBeautifulOne says:

    Preach Jane!
    “I’m light and I’m ok” silliness, we all know you’re ok”
    LOL! or I’m big and I’m ok, I celebrate my size 14-22. Yes! Celebrate it girl!
    I’m celebrating the fact that I’m a size 8! Yay for everybody!
    Jane do you have a blog?

  35. I’ve stayed off the comments here because the discussion has turned away from Michelle Obama and become a discussion of skin tones. I really would like to see a conversation not become about the issues that we divide our own community with. But I do need to defend myself — I never said anything about Michelle Obama being “the only” intelligent black woman in any way. I don’t see where anyone said that. There have been many who paved the way, and many who choose to stay behind the scenes to effect political change. I chose Michelle Obama because she’s in the spotlight right now, her family is poised for what looks to be a bright political future, and she’s making really interesting waves in the media. That’s all.

  36. tallphlihoney says:

    Ok. Since I see this is a futile discussion to have, this is the last post I will make on this subject. 1) Bella, my apologies for getting off topic. You are right, this is about Michelle Obama and how uber-fantastic she truly is. Agreed. I appreciate your work immensely and am not trying to upset the vibe. 2) If anyone cared to go back and read the initial post from Melinda I referred to, I think they could see my point more clearly. Let me get this right, based on Melinda’s comment, if Michelle were the exact same person, but lighter it would not only make her (ACCORDING TO MELINDA) a “typical light-skinned trophy wife?” Further, if she were lighter is would reflect negatively on Barack because (ACCORDING TO MELINDA) just because Michelle is darker “It says so much more about Obama’s choice in women.” WTH??? And other commenters think I am the one with the “issues”. Glamour puss had one thing right – “WOW”. This is what it is, huh? I am DONE and I digress… I think Michelle and Barack are the future of this country and people of all colors are recognizing the valuable contributions Blacks (across the Diaspora) make towards making the place better. Nice post, Bella.

  37. bella great post. michelle seems too cool for politics. hope both her and barack dont get too “tied in”.
    not to egg on this diversion from main topic…but maybe this is a topic you can discuss. i’d really love to hear your opinion. i have my own but i’ll not venture there at this moment ;-)

  38. I’m not going to enter this war. I’m am so through with this topic.

  39. TheBeautifulOne says:

    Good. Then let’s all get back to important things like making intelligent, thought-provoking comments about the current political climate, scene, etc.

  40. wanabdcgirl says:

    I love how someone above touted Michelle Obama as the “New Womanhood”. I love it! She is gracious and classy while still being strong and unflinching.

    Didn’t read all the comments but skimmed and notice the light skinned/dark skinned issue had emerged. Why? All Black women are beautiful. If we can’t acknowledge that ourselves, no one else will do it for us. Get over it!!!

  41. I adore Michelle Obama. She just seems so grounded and real. I have immense respect for her, and I’m rooting for her to keep being herself throughout this entire grueling process. Of course the media is out for blood, because she’s not a Black woman that they can pigeonhole into a box or stereotype. She’s a full-blooded, well-rounded, intelligent, caring, loving Black woman, wife, mother and professional….simply put, she scares the life out of them.

  42. anxiously awaiting says:

    OMG. I’m so glad I found this page praising the beauty, grace, brillance, confidence, all that and many bags of chips of, Michelle Obama. My she does my heart good to see carrying the torch as a proud black woman standing beside her man and possibly becoming the very first African American first lady. As we await the tallies of the primaries I am overtaken with joy that there is a great possibility her husband may win the nomination and go on to win the presidency. I’m almost shivering thinking that a black man of great esteem and credential with a black woman at his side that stands equal in her own right could actually head this nation. I am hopeful but realize that the competition is very stiff. Clinton and Obama are very close to tying and I realize that Obama could very well lose. Yet I am grateful for this time and place in American history and hope that he wins. And if he doesn’t that he will try again. Go Obama and Michelle Go!!!!!!

  43. Lorby Adams says:

    What an inane blog full of gush and gossip. She will not make it to the White House. She is a troublemaker.

    But I guess we all see what we want to see.

  44. Michelle Obama is to be admired and respected for who she is, just like you do. She is the wife of Barack Obama and compliments him well, as he does her. Barack and Michelle are blessed and they fit.

  45. Tina Thompson says:

    I am happy that I came across this web-site, i must say that I am very happy, very happy as I am a beautiful black woman, born in South Florida, my parents in South Georgia; they both taught me love, love for them, love for myself, and others; I am thrilled with that love that is enduring, as it is real; I am so happy that finally we will have a Black family in the White house, we have worked so hard for it; suffered so long, and now our very hard work has paid off, my love, special love to the Barack O’Bama family and to you all for having this website; I must visit it again, thanks and enjoy

  46. Michelle is an inspiration. Certainly, I can see why she is a wonderful role model and inspiration for black ladies. As a white woman, I can also honestly say that her ideas and how she lives her life resonate with me more than any other woman I’ve come across in the media for a long time. Although Hilary Clinton is a good woman, only Michelle combines service to the needy with intelligence, a career, style, and a palpable love for her husband and children. Barack and Michelle display so much love for each other; how wonderful for all Americans-both black and white-to have such a positive, sincere relationship on view as our penultimate model for how to treat each other.

  47. I LOVE MICHELLE OBAMA!!!!!
    i thank God for positive black role models for families. because there are so many negative examples of african american families. There needs to be more families like them. im glad my family is together…

  48. introvertedbeauty says:

    I *heart* Michelle Obama!
    She is a positive figure of an intelligent, refined & beautiful brown skin African American woman that I and many other brown and dark-skinned women have so longed to see in the not only national but world spotlight. During those days when I am overwhelmed with images of beyonces, halles and the light-skinned “guess-what-nationality-i-am” images of black women that plague black media, women like Michelle Obama give me a sense of pride and inspiration that I am beautiful and worthy of adoration– even with my brown skin :-)

  49. I don’t care what her “skin-tone” is. She’s intrusive and so is her husbands administration. She doesn’t need to tell me what to eat. I want both of them to stay out of my personal life.

Trackbacks

  1. [...] The democratic party nomination race is in a dead heat and I’ve been soaking up all the coverage like a sponge. Now’s a great time to educate yourself about the candidates by watching the debates. I’m a sucker for a great orator and I’m wary of political dynasties, so Barack Obama piqued my interest early on. I think the senator is a charming and fascinating enough gentleman on his own. But there’s something undeniably special about his wife, Michelle. The more I see and learn about her, the more I love this lady! She’s totally a friend-in-my-head and there are three compelling reasons why I had to name this bella Afrobella of the Week – regardless of the way she wears her hair. (more) [...]

  2. [...] The Chicago Tribune is calling Barack Obama’s victory in the Iowa caucus “historic and convincing.” Watching him standing and waving at his rapturous audience, alongside his beautiful wife (and former Afrobella of the Week), I gotta tell you its moving. And inspiring. [...]

  3. [...] Y’all already know how I feel about Michelle Obama. So that description of her as “vicious” seemed to come from nowhere. This e mail started out as a chain letter, similar to the ones being forwarded all over the country. Getting that explanation from the forwarder (who identifies as a Democrat, by the way), really struck me. I could have continued the e mail exchange to ask what in the world did Michelle Obama ever say or do to come across as hungry or vicious, or what exactly did “hidden agenda” mean, but I didn’t want my blood pressure to spike any further and I didn’t have any more time to waste on a pointless argument with an almost-stranger. There’s nothing I can do to change a point of view stained with prejudice. It’d be like trying to reason with Rosanne. SMH. [...]

  4. [...] said it before and I’ll say it again — I find Michelle Obama to be absolutely fascinating. I realize that not everyone sees her the same way — where I see the modern Jackie Kennedy, [...]

  5. [...] more I write about the Obamas, the more nasty comments I start getting… just today, someone posted a negative comment on my Michelle Obama Afrobella of the Week post (written in August of last year, mind you). I don’t believe in censuring dissenting opinions, [...]

  6. [...] presidential run, Michelle Obama sometimes made depreciating comments about her husband, which some observers saw as having a positive effect on him, a way to keep him grounded, down-to-earth so to speak, while the campaign was [...]

  7. […] found (see below) was in an article extolling Michelle Obama, dated August 20, 2007, on the website Afrobella. The pic is undated. If we go by the date of the Afrobella article, Malia would be 9 years old and […]

  8. […] (see below) was in an article extolling Michelle Obama, dated August 20, 2007, on the website Afrobella. The pic is undated. If we go by the date of the Afrobella article, Malia would be 9 years old and […]

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