A Question for You

Bellas,

I don’t know if there’s a day that goes by, that I don’t get a press release or info, or request for advertising or sponsorship, or even unsolicited product mailed to me…intended for readers with relaxed or straight hair. I get info about wigs and weaves and flat irons and products to make hair straight by any means necessary. I choose not to write about any of it, because my blog is called AFRObella and it’s always been about celebrating natural beauty.

But I know that I have many readers who wear their hair straight, and I’ve heard from readers who say they sometimes feel excluded, because of my choice to focus on natural, kinky, curly, coily hair. Hence this informal poll.

natural hair or relaxed hair

Photo via styleblazer.com

My mother, my sister, my aunts…they all choose to wear their hair relaxed, and we have learned over time not to judge each other’s hair choices. At times I’ve realized that I have come across as preachy on the topic of natural hair while in conversation with them, so I’ve even cut back on talking about hair. I might offer some advice if they complain to me about breakage, or ask about a gentle product that might work for their texture. My relatives all read my blog and love my blog, despite the fact that I exclude them in terms of my hair coverage.

I know many natural haired women who use heat to straighten their hair. Who use weaves in their protective styles. Who love a good wig from time to time. Who are proud of their hair’s health as they wear it in a straight style. And it makes me feel sad to hear from readers who tell me that they feel excluded or judged when they read my blog. I never want to be divisive or hurtful to anyone.

When I don’t know how to respond to something or how to answer a question, I prefer to defer to an expert. So my question is – how would Afrobella readers feel, if there was a resident natural but straight hair expert who occasionally posted here on the site about topics like wigs and heat straightening? I’d be looking for a contributor who could speak to safe, smart ways to protect your hair while you wear it in straight styles — with an emphasis on healthy hair, always.

For now this is just an idea. I just wanted to put it out there, to see what your thoughts would be, because your opinions matter to me the most!

With love,
Afrobella

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Comments

  1. Meh. I’m sorry to be neither yay nor nay on the subject, but I think I would appreciate this other contributor’s comments, especially in the wintertime when I think I’m going to straighten my hair in order to protect it (bizarre concept, I know, but my hair is in that in between stage. It’s longer than a TWA, but I still can’t put it in a bun). However, I don’t think they need to blog daily. Maybe once a month? I appreciate your blog the way it is!

    • thanks!! Yes I was thinking once a month. I don’t like to overwhelm with too many guest posts as it is…just want to give all of my readers info that pertains to their beauty, as they choose to represent it! Thanks for responding :)

  2. GREAT IDEA. There are a number of ways to wear, style, and care for our naturally curly hair.

    There’s so much more to natural hair than locs, natural afros, etc. Having a natural but straight hair expert would sincerely highlight the options we have as natural hair wearers. Hair frustrations are very real, and having a resource for ideas, and tips becomes incredibly valuable.

    Excellent post!

  3. This is a tough one, but I believe in you and your vision for your blog. I believe you should stay true to it. Popular culture, mainstream media images of beauty…there are so many influencers showing us over and over again that beauty, desirebility, sexy = long straight hair. Stay true to the Afrobella “natural hair is beautiful” message. Those of us who straighten our hair or have naturally straight hair shouldn’t feel excluded …this blog is simply not about that.

  4. I think that is a perfect idea. And i think to having that will give a person that is possibly thinking about going natural weigh in on both sides so that they can make a sound and educated decision if they do decide to switch over. It can help dispell some myths about black hair that some of us women cling to and for some deter us from either straight relaxed, weaved or flat ironed hair or natural, loc’d, twisted hair. Nice article

  5. I think it is a great idea. You don’t choose to straighten your hair or use weave so why should you know a lot about that? Of course you wouldn’t cover it but someone else sure does and can. There is much natural beauty in straight hair and it isn’t a sin to say it!

  6. Patrice, I’ve learned a long time ago that no matter what I do, or how inclusive and accomodating I am, I’ll NEVER make everyone happy(this is both in my personal and professional lives). As a natural for over 15+ years, I’ve done and worn it all….braiding/twisting(with and without extensions), weaving, full and half wigs, natural texture and heat straightening. I would appreciate reading aguest expert on straightening and wigs for naturals, because it’s not often I see something like that on natural hair blogs. Everyone approaches their hair journey differently, and it would be nice to get more tips and hints about straightening, wig/weave advice for naturals.

    • Geri, you’re giving me a new way to look at Bella’s question. I do think it would be interesting to hear from experts on options for natural hair wearers including wigs, straightening, etc. Good point!

  7. Sheree Thomp[son says:

    There are tons of blogs and websites catering to straight hair. As a reader, it’s nice to have a place that’s all about topics I care about. I say, stick to your niche. BUT if YOU feel like you want to expand your base, then a monthly guest blogger is a good idea. And it wouldn’t turn me away from your blog.

  8. Ericka Taylor says:

    I whole heartedly believe that you should not try to please every one of your readers. But I think a once a month sort of thing would be fine. As Sheree stated above, mainstream has to see a PLETHORA of cover up…aka straight hair talk and wig & weave styles on almost all platforms catering to black women/women of color, so your niche of primarily highlighting natural…kinky/curly, etc. hair is MUCH appreciated and SO needed.

  9. I think this is an amazing idea. There are many different departments to natural hair and including them all prove to be another reason why Afrobella is the leader when it comes to natural hair discussion in the e-space. Who knows, maybe a post about transitioning through a wig or weaves can inspire those who thought they could never see themselves natural. Knowledge is power. Rock on, my Bella.

  10. im neither here or there on the issue of straight hair but i feel like the reason why so many ppl appreciate your blog is because everything you post on here you actually live it, use it, wear it etc so your distinct voice comes across as authentic. even when u have used contributors previously those contributors still shared their views on things you would actually incorporate in your own lifestyle. i dont feel that way when it comes to you and straight hair/weave/wigs etc. i would continue to be an avid reader regardless though. #mytwocents

  11. I love your site does not make anyone upset. Over hair styles ways. I love heat but toned it down after coloring. off topic oops

  12. I think there is enough information already out there about how to straighten your hair. I love your blog the way it is and that you cater to women who wear their hair in its natural state.

    • i agree! it’s not that i’m anti-anything but i like your current mix and don’t feel interested in topics like straightening. you’re well rounded though so if you decided to add it, it wouldn’t deter me from coming to the site a couple of times a week.

  13. My initial thought was “it’s your blog girl, do what you want”! While the Afro portion of your blog lends towards the natural, it’s the Bella portion that has always added the ooomph and cache to me. I’ve always thought you’ve celebrated being the best beauty you can be with the extra touch of going at it naturally. However, while you can not appease everyone, you have to admit your fan base has grown and i’m sure they’d love to see a non natural shout out every so often. My suggestion would be if give it a 3 month run with a weekly guest non natural post and if it proves to be a hit, then have the guest host sistah up to your blog and vice versa. If it doesn’t go well, then you tried :-)

  14. I think that it would be great to have an occasional post about natural but straightened hair. I didn’t make an intentional decision to go natural, I was pressing for a looong time after a bad relaxer and some other issues. I made a decision this past February to embrace my natural texture, and I love it! But…. I loved it straight too, back when it still looked somewhat healthy. Now that fall and winter are coming (no more heat and humidity!!!), I kinda want to see what it looks like straight again. Any info that can help me do that with as little damage as possible would be awesome!!!

  15. I think it’s a great idea.

    Peace, Love and Chocolate,
    Tiffany

  16. I personally would love it. I’m tempted to raise my hand and say me! me! let me do it! but I have my own site I can barely keep up with hahaha. As a straight natural myself I adore this site and would love to find tips for my hairlife on here.

  17. Afrobella… Beautiful Afro… Pretty Afro…u get what I am saying. Blog is for natural hair… our hair products, our hair tips. Not judgmental, not preachy, just PRO natural is all.

  18. I would welcome this advise, not because I wear my hair straight but because my natural-hair daughter chooses this option 85% of the time. Her hair is healthier than her relaxed sisters, because we deep condition every other week and instead of blowing it dry we air dry since the flat iron is next. We also use heat protectants when using the flat-iron which cuts down on over-shedding of the hair (she has very little if any). So I would find this helpful

  19. It wouldn’t phase me either way. I’m going through a natural transition now that I’m loving. I have gone straight/sported a weave etc, but that did nothing but damage my hair, I was actually shocked at how a hairdresser in business for years was not at all knowledgeable about the correct procedures to use for my type of hair or any hair for that matter, it became just a paycheck I assume. Anything you have to offer, I’m game.

  20. I have relaxed hair, but I still read Afrobella on the daily because I value your voice and writing style (and the monday manicures- bring them back!). I wouldn’t mind some guest posts on straightening- I’m willing to be there are lots of us (natural, but straighten or relaxed hair) who feel similarly.

  21. I do think it’s a good idea to cover wigs, weaves, extensions, etc, since they are common options for naturals. We all like to mix it up without permanently coloring or straightening our hair

  22. I think if your main product stays the same and you add tidbits for the other side you will be fine. You just don’t want to become a Whole Foods. In the sense that, initially they were predominately organic and now you have to really search for organic foods in certain sections. Just keep the happy balance and you will be fine.

    Nzingah

  23. I would be sadden if you talked about straight hair but then again I understand. This is the USA where we have to cater to white standards of beauty.

    What I loved about your blog is that it was a place where hair talk automatically centered around natural hair styles of women of African descent. Just like hair talk catered to naturally straight haired women are the normative, I came here so I can be the norm.

    But again this is the USA, we have to catered to some version of straight hair beauty because there isn’t enough outlets for it already

  24. Patrice,
    I’m glad you are asking the question because I believe we need to bridge the relationship with all types of hair wearers. We meet at my salon when we did a meet up together for Carol’s Daughter. I realized there is a lot of information that both natural and straight hair wearer could share. I have built a profession over 25 years on healthy hair no matter what choice of style a women chooses. The experience from working with so many textures of hair a creditable
    professional could share with the current natural
    hair wearer is invaluable.
    Spring

  25. Candy Caines says:

    I’m sorry that there are people that feel excluded, but everyone deserves a safe space, and I feel afrobella is a safe space for bellas with natural hair. I would definitely continue to come to your site if you chose to start covering straight hair, but I would be very disappointed.

  26. in 1997 I went natural and I thought I don’t care who relaxes their har so why do they care that I don’t. I think having another side whould show that all natural bellas are not millitnat and angry that another person has chosen another hair style that suits them.just as I was free to go natural, my friends, famiy are free to relax and weave as they see fit.
    Afrobella is all shades of beautiful and including all will help expand your site to others I know people love a well written cheerful blog.

  27. Have a section for relaxed hair

  28. miss mango-moods says:

    i echo the sentiment about the seasonal change and how it affects transitional hairstyles between straight and curly. so i would be enthusiastic about your inclusion of an expert on the best methods to achieving varied looks without compromising my hair’s health or integrity.

    i used to have a natural curly mane when i started reading this blog 4 years ago. i dont anymore. i did a very short pixie cut last year, and just didnt want to revert to my teenie weenie afro so i succumbed to the relaxer. yet still, my hair is healthy.

    i’ve grown accustomed to the ability to refrain from chemically relaxing for a few months just to have a straight out the shower wavy/curly do. but at the same time, i cant have wet hair while walking out the door in the colder months. i need advice or im just gonna take another dip in the creamy crack

  29. Oh, Afrobella! You’ve asked the $64,000 question.

    My heart wants AFRObella to remain true to those of us who’ve found (or are discovering) the beauty in our splendiferous naturalness. But my head asks, “Isn’t Afrobella supposed to be reflective of ‘ALL shades of beautiful?’”

    I have a question for YOU. What’s really more important? Is it staying true to Afrobella’s original mission of singing the praises of all things natural? Or is it highlighting all-encompassing beauty, fashion, and fabulousity (including infinite options with our hair)? I’m personally hoping you’ll remain steadfast in your commitment to the kinky-curly-coily, but I’d certainly understand if you opt to be more inclusive. If you go with the later option, IMO, you might be diluting what I feel is the unspoken takeaway from your blog, i.e. we are perfectly okay, dare I say “beautiful,” as we are.

    Strong brands, like Afrobella, have successfully established a powerful emotional connection between their vision and people’s expectations. I’m not advocating that things must always remain the same. However, once you start tampering with your brand (and messaging), even to provide more options, sometimes people reject the change. Remember Coca-Cola’s reformulation, New Coke? …a big failure.

    It might help to consider what we risk says a lot about what we value.
    (Bear in mind, risks are not always negative. Taking risks can have a positive or negative effect on an outcome.)

    Geri alluded to it above. You’ll never make everyone happy. All the best…in making the decision that is best for you!

  30. Brown-eyed Girl says:

    Dear Patrice,

    I would prefer you to stick with the natural/kinky/coily focus. No one can be all things to all Afrobellas. Let someone else create a blog for those with relaxed hair or who like weaves. It’s a wonderful, wide-open opportunity for another blog.

  31. I think it’s a good idea – you never know who you might educate and even convert.

    I recorded a podcast this year with a panel of all black women and hair was our lengthiest and most divisive topic. Our panel consisted of both natural and straight hair wearers and what came to forefront is how we judge each other so harshly when it comes to our hairstyles when essentially, it’s JUST hair. Black women might be the only group that are fortunate enough to have so many options when it comes to hair styles. By incorporating all choices, you’ll be bridging a gap between the two sides which is commendable.

    Here are the links to our podcast. It was so juicy, it was a three-part conversation:

    http://www.blackisonline.com/2011/04/black-women-speak-hair1/

    http://www.blackisonline.com/2011/06/15-minute-break-black-women-on-black-hair-part-ii/

    http://www.blackisonline.com/2011/08/15-minute-break-black-women-on-black-hair/

    Good luck with whatever you decide.

  32. I think it’s a good idea! While I am newly natural and too in love with my curls and having big hurr in the future is too enticing to me to be personally interested in straightening my hair right now, there are a lot of naturals who DO want that information. The best thing about being natural is the diversity in hairstyles and what I love about your site is that it’s NOT preachy… you love what you love about your hair without judging those who don’t do it your way.

    So yeah, I think that would fit nicely with your site, especially since the main concern would be keeping the hair healthy. Or as healthy as possible with straightening.

  33. Dear Patrice,

    For so long it has been women with natural hair that have been excluded from the mainstream hair dialogue. It is so refreshing, encouraging and inspiring to have a place like Afrobella where all of the images and information are about natural hair.

    Do thin people feel alienated by blogs about full-figured fashion? I would hope not. Could they still learn a thing or two about themselves on such a site? I think they could!
    You can’t please all of the people all of the time but you can respect them. I feel that the question you’ve posed to your readers truly demonstrates the respect you have for all women, regardless of how they choose to where their hair. But until natural hair has gone totally mainstream, I think you should keep Afrobella as it is: naturally beautiful.

  34. I don’t like the idea. I won’t apologize for loving the natural hair focus of your site.

    There simply aren’t many places on the web like what you have here.

    However, it IS your site and I won’t stop reading because you start to focus on straight hair (though I feel those with straight hair can find help ALL over the web *sigh*) You can’t be ALL things to ALL people. If they feel excluded that is THEIR issue…the site name is AFRObella. I don’t think it’s fair for anyone to ask you to change focus, now if it’s what YOU want then so be it.

    It’s kind of like going to a site for vegetarians and saying “gee I really wish you would talk about meat. I like meat and I need you to cater to me…I feel left out.”

    Just makes no sense.

  35. Afrobella has become somewhat synonymous with natural hair. You can certainly add an occasional column with tips on the use of heat,weaves and wigs. But be careful not to step too far from your niche.

  36. I am happy and relieved that we, Sistas, at this point in time have choices. I value your advice about natural hair. Because I trust you I would also appreciate good information for if or when I choose to straighten my hair.

  37. What would be the point? Black women are overloaded with information on how to straighten our hair. There is no lack of positive imagery for women who choose to straighten their hair. I’ve been natural for over a decade now, and people still offer me unsolicited advice on how to straighten my hair. The other day, my friend and I were having dinner and our waiter (white) offered us his boyfriend’s card for styling. His hook was that his boyfriend “specialized” in straightening Black hair with heat and had learned secret techniques in Atlanta. I politely informed him that I like my hair texture just fine and have no interest at all in altering it. He was absolutely flabbergasted that neither of us were interested in having our hair “fixed”.

    So no, I have no interest at all in reading anything about straight hair. It’s your blog and you can do what you will but I’ll stop reading because my interest lie elsewhere.

  38. Bella,
    You are speaking of an occasional posting on hair straightening for naturals, right? It’s not as though you plan to turn this into a “straight hair blog”. I think the majority of your readers would be fine with that. The truth is the natural haired women wear there hair in different ways especially with seasonal changes. BTW, I am a natural who wears her hair curly but truthfully some of us curly/kinky naturals need to get over ourselves. You post almost daily, so no one will be harmed if you devote one post per month to ” hair straightening”. As long as you keep your main focus what is it will be fine. If that’s what you want to do I say go for it.

  39. Don’t change. I currently wear my hair relaxed, yet I feel very included.

  40. I’ve been reading your blog since before I could buy a drink (I’m 25 now) because initially it was one of three places online where one could discuss natural hair. I’ve been natural since I was 14 and the first few years were rough because there was NO ONE I could talk to about it. I can’t see a 14 year old with a weave or straightened hair having the same problem then or now. I’m glad that the online natural hair community has grown so expansively, but that’s mostly because it was the only place we could find each other.

    It’s your blog, I’m not going to tell you what to do, but the black hair care industry is catered to straight-haired women or weave wearers. The fact that you are getting inundated daily with ads or products for it is proof enough.

    I’m no nappy nazi, but coming to a blog called AFRObella when you don’t have one and then complaining about being left out seems absurd to me. It’s like going to a raw food vegan site and complaining that there are no recipes for hamburgers. I really don’t get it.

    I really think you should stick to your original vision for the site because we kinky-curly girls are still in the VAST minority. But I wouldn’t stop reading if there was a post every once and awhile.

  41. I like the idea and think it’s good to have a balance. (if you want, it’s your site)

    I have several friends that are natural and I am happy for them and totally support their journey and their blogs and you tube channels. However, sometimes it does seem like many black women today treat you like a traitor if you don’t want to go natural. I have healthy relaxed, hair and I’m happy with it. Regardless of how you choose to wear your hair, it is important to take of your hair just like you take care of the rest of your body and your holistic self. Whether you’re chemical free or relaxed, curly or straight, as black women we should still know we are beautiful, smart and fabulous!

  42. Personally, I’m not interested in straightening, weaves or relaxed hair. I would like for your blog to stay true to the mission of your blog. However, I recognize this may be an opportunity for you to grow your blog. With that said, I say do what you think is best, and if you choose to add those subjects I just won’t read those sections and continue to read the sections that matter to me.

  43. Bella,

    I’m almost a year totally natural and this fall & winter I plan to experiment with wearing wigs as a protective style & currently have my hair in a protective style that incorporates naturally curly braided hair. While I embrace my hair in it’s totally natural state, I do need a break from time to time and with length retention being my goal, protective styling is key. Quite frankly even when I’m attempting to wear my hair totally OUT, I have a styling catastrophe & need a quick go to back up. I would appreciate an occasional article about this method or even safely using heat styling. Right now I’m terrified to heat style my hair because of the possibility of heat damage. What you’ve suggested (a resident natural but straight hair expert who occasionally posted here on the site about topics like wigs and heat straightening?) doesn’t seem to be a divergence from your core audience of natural haired curlies, but rather some additional alternatives to styling our hair.

    And for your relaxed family members or others who may feel excluded in your focus on natural hair here or in other natural hair communities, I’ve found some awesome resources for healthy relaxed hair care online that they can reference. Here is a link to the top 5 relaxed hair blogs if they are interested. (Nothing wrong with sharing.)

    http://www.networkedblogs.com/topic/relaxed_hair/

    Thanks for loving us enough to ask our opinion!

    Trinita AKA NaturallyNita

  44. I’m a natural and I see nothing wrong in straightening your hair once in a while. I understand where the others are coming from as far as staying with natural hair articles. I think if you’re going to do this, you should have a seperate category for it. But it’s really your call. I trust you’ll make the best deicision for yourself and your blog.

    -Seleema

  45. It seems to be a divisive topic with strong opinions on both sides but I for one would like to see the occasional post about how to make you naturally curly hair straight. I have bra length (when straight) part kinky/corkscrew/curly/afro/straighthair and would love to read the occasional post on how best to work with it when straight. As has been said, ALL shades of beautiful.

  46. Tahitian Moon says:

    I read this blog for your great writing. I am a natural bella, but sometimes I like to switch it up and flat-iron my hair. I’m never going back to the creamy crack, but I would like to know how I could safely straighten my hair. I am a long-time reader and I trust your judgement.

  47. I’ve been reading your blog for several years and really appreciate the work you’ve done and continue to do. You have done quite a bit to showcase the beauty of natural hair. Also, you created All of My Purple Life, and for that I will be forever grateful!

    Regarding your question, I feel that I’ve read similar posts on several prominent natural hair blogs I follow. In my opinion, there’s a backlash to the increasing visibility and prominence of black women wearing their natural black hair, as well as the supportive communities that have developed. I’ve been natural for going on 13 years, and I still appreciate having what I feel are spaces that are for women who wear their hair natural. Even though black women wearing their hair unstraightened/kinky/curly is gaining more visibility (especially online and in the mainstream media), it is certainly not the norm in most popular media (movies, television, other areas of the internet, on black celebrities). Therefore, I still think it’s important to maintain spaces where the beauty of unstraightened and unenhanced (via wigs, weaves, and the like) is the norm and celebrated.

    I appreciate the work you do, and ultimately this is your blog. Listen to your small, still voice.

  48. i think you created the Afrobella brand to serve a purpose and you should make sure that your purpose is fulfilled through it. When you move away from purpose sometimes (no all the time) you lose direction. People follow this site for a reason. Pray and meditate for all answers.

  49. Sandra Yvette says:

    If they have some good information, please share it.

  50. I would not mind. I am natural who uses wigs and soon weaves and *gasp* heat. However I like your blog how it is but the introduction of a natural contributor discussing protective styles and healthy ways of using alternative hair choices is fine with me. It just shows how your blog has grown. I know you are not judgemental and this monthly or twice monthly inclusion will add to your blog and not take away from it.

    I will read your blog regardless cos I loves it

  51. Please don’t. If I want info on using heat to straighten or wearing wigs, I would look for that blog. Afrobella is my refuge from the people and products that tell me that there is something wrong with my natural texture. If you must, how about twice a year?

    • After doing a 2nd thought on this…I agree with DryMartini…no one in the mainstream hair industry have thought about us for all these decades and now they see a natural hair revolution, they’re rubbing their hands together…it’s all about the $$$ with them. In the words of Michael Jackson “they don’t care about us”

  52. I’m actually one of those women who you are referring to (haven’t had a relaxer in over a year, but wear my hair straight).
    I would LOVE ideas on products etc.. to use. I do feel left on a lot of natural blogs even though I feel I am semi-natural:)

  53. Please! This is one of the few places on the web where women who look like me are the main focus. I like that. All black women have a hard time finding beauty info, “main stream” magazines (InStlye, Vouge, Cosmo) act like black women don’t exist. Then there are the black fashion mags, they tend to focus on relaxed hair. So at least the relaxed sisters have that.

    And then there’s this blog, a wonderful place where women who look like me are celebrated! And I don’t have to see ads that teel me my hair is wrong.

    Please don’t change it.

  54. I wouldn’t stop reading/following the site, but it would be like the straight hair articles in Essence — I wouldn’t read them. Besides as much as natural hair seems to be everywhere, there are only a handful of places that I trust for information about natural hair. There are plenty of places to get advice about wigs, weaves and relaxers in MHO.

  55. Vivrant Thang says:

    Lort! I almost wish you had edited the post with your comment that it would only be once a month or so :) Occassionally wasn’t enough!

    I have been locked now for 1.5 years and before that wore “sis twists” for many years to transition. I’m not really for the heat or weaves at this point but others are. It’s their hair and their choice. I see nothing wrong with expanding your coverage a BIT to provide them with info too. Do it!

    And bottom line, on every blog I read if there is a post I’m not interested in, I skip it and come back for the next. Everything ain’t for everybody.

    • I agree with you, Vivrant. If there’s a post I’m not interested in, I pass it by (remember that song by the Pharcyde?!).

      Bella, I enjoy your blog as is, and there’s plenty of room in the blogosphere for everyone. I doubt straight hair will ever become the bulk of your blog. Your blog is soooo much more than hair anyway. So, as for whether to post on straight hair/heat styling, sure, why not!

  56. Unfortunately, straight hair is still seen as the norm in this society, whether we admit it or not. There are billions of references, guides, magazines, websites, etc., geared toward straight hair, and making hair straighter. You are the exception, and for that I thank you. I will never straighten my hair, I have no desire to straighten my hair, and if I wanted to straighten my hair, I wouldn’t have wasted time going natural. Please leave things the way they are. I’ve left “natural” websites that show way too many flatironed coifs. I don’t get the point.

  57. One more thing: As far as appearance goes, there is no difference between relaxed, straightened, flatironed, or weaved. There are plenty of references out there for that type of hair. We don’t need yet another one.

  58. I’m not adverse to the occasional reference to a straight style because I understand you might want to be more inclusive from a business perspective. As others indicated, I’ll simply ignore those posts. I do love your natural, organic style though – it’s what really makes your blog stand out from the other natural hair blogs and it is why it’s one of my regular reads. peace to you whatever you choose.

  59. As a natural who sometimes wears her hair straight I wouldn’t mind seeing articles about heat styling on your website. I think like others have said if I’m not interested in a particular article, I’ll just read another post. I like the idea of diversification! Do whatever you’re comfortable with…I’ll still support ya Bella!

  60. Its called Afrobella. if they want heat styling, perms and wigs, there is a wealth of information out here already! Tons of mags, Its the natural haircare arena thats lacking smdh. Are woman really complaining About this? Seriously?

    So then what are naturals suppose to do then? Its not about judging or excluding. its you exspressing what your passion is. You cant save the world. Im sure those women can find what they need else where, i know it sounds brass but its real. Dont ever compromise your beliefs. Everybody doesnt wanna drink that cool aid and buy into that look so they come to websites like yours or other natural hair blogs
    Peace

  61. Maybe you should just link to those who are doing straight hair in the best way. Let them who are the experts teach about straightening black hair. You can’t be everything to all people, dear AFRObella!!

    Sometimes when we try to do it all, it comes across in a watered down way. Jill of all trades, master of none. Don’t do it or you wouldn’t be true to you. We know that you have a heart of gold, and that’s why you are loved.

    I talk about the politics of black hair and beauty, and link to you and others who talk about the practicality of black beauty and hair. I tried doing the practicality before, but became bored because my heart is in the POLITICS of it!

  62. NtrlGAGirl says:

    I think it’s a fabulous idea, even as I don’t wear my hair straightened. Your header obviously indicates that your site is so more than “hair-centered” (Beauty|Hair|Culture|Life)…and for those of us that might even consider alternative style options that don’t involve chemical for our hair, this would be a great thing–there would be no need to search out “all those other sites” as the info would be here on a site we already love to read!

    Thanks for putting the question out there!

  63. I am a natural woman who wears my hair straightened, but I agree with the majority of the ladies. Leave it NATURAL (NON-STRAIGHTENED). Stick to what works. If they want styling or hair questions there are other forums/blogs for that.

  64. My hair is natural but I wear weaves, wigs (natural) and invisible braids. I love tons and tons of hair. My motto is you can never have enough hair. If I’m interested in weaves, there are plenty of blogs and magazines I can buy. I would never have a relaxer ever again. Haven’t had one in 3-4 years. The only reason some of these companies want to give you items because they see the $$$$$ in the community of curly/natural hair. I see so many asian beauty stores going out of business because more black women are wearing their hair natural. There’s black products and various companies coming out because of this movement. Some people just want a part of it. Please don’t let them in. The reason I love all these natural blogs is I’m learning to love my hair. This wouldn’t have happen if it wasn’t for blogs and you tubes. I just wish you all were around in the 70′s. I would love to see more afro hair to use for protective styles, afro wigs (that don’t look like clowns)

  65. KEEP IT NATURAL, I beg you. whats the point of covering or shaving our heads to wear an indian womans hair? Like others have mentioned there are so many sites that cater to straight hair/ hair straightening of black hair. We ought to know by now how to make our hair straight, that has been the “only way” to do our hair for years now. Our hair is the only hair in the world that doesn’t mimic anothers so lets continue to embrace it and love it. Its God given.

    Peace Ladies

  66. I disagree with most…. the main reason I’m currently transitioning to natural is to have healthy, thick and thriving hair. Now with that said it does not mean I don’t like straight hair styles. So please do provide information on how to safely straighten natural hair in order to have more styling choices. Thank you

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